End of Death Robot

(Source: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=WuYTfKMveLk)

Read: https://www.cnet.com/news/last-moment-robot-end-of-life-detected/

Chen, an artist, designer, and engineer who just graduated from the Rhode Island School of Design with an MFA in Digital + Media, built the machine as one of a series of functional robots capable of reenacting human social behaviors. But just how much can a machine impart comfort and security?

Therapeutic robots have been used with other populations as well, including autistic children. But the idea of what is, in essence, a robot hospice worker, pushes the conceptual boundaries of human-machine interaction to places some people might not be ready to go. Which is precisely what Chen wants to do.

“The device is meant to raise questions,” he says. “The process of dying is probably the most vulnerable moment of a human life, where one seeks the assurance of human connection. In this installation, human presence is replaced with a robot, questioning the quality of intimacy without humanity.”

(Katz, 2012)

Questions:

  1. What do you think is the “right” way to die?
  2. Would you like to be accompanied by a robot as you die? What about your mobile phone?
  3. People subcontract out many manual jobs – for example, there are domestic servants to do housework, nannies to look after babies, tutors to teach children. Have human beings become disconnected from each other that even death becomes a detached affair?
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Never too old to code: Meet Japan’s 82-year-old app-maker

Source: https://youtu.be/BXnjNCX6Ai4

https://sg.news.yahoo.com/never-too-old-code-meet-japans-82-old-033639266.html

When 82-year-old Masako Wakamiya first began working she still used an abacus for maths — today she is one of the world’s oldest iPhone app developers, a trailblazer in making smartphones accessible for the elderly.

Frustrated by the lack of interest from the tech industry in engaging older people, she taught herself to code and set about doing it herself.

The over 60s, she insists, need to actively search out new skills to stay nimble.

“As you age, you lose many things: your husband, your job, your hair, your eyesight. The minuses are quite numerous. But when you learn something new, whether it be programming or the piano, it is a plus, it’s motivating,” she says.

“Once you’ve achieved your professional life, you should return to school. In the era of the internet, if you stop learning, it has consequences for your daily life,” Wakamiya explains during an AFP interview at her home near Tokyo.

Wakamiya says her ultimate goal is to come up with “other apps that can entertain older people and help transmit to young people the culture and traditions we old people possess”.

“Most old people have abandoned the idea of learning, but the fact that some are starting (again) is not only good for them but for the country’s economy,” said Wakamiya, who took up the piano at 75.

Hinting that her good health is down to an active mind and busy life, she adds: “I am so busy everyday that I have no time to look for diseases.”

Questions:

  • Why is it important to keep the brain active?
  • What are ways for people to keep their minds active?
  • What are some issues that are faced by older people?
  • Why is it important to engage older people?

Patients should have the right to choose marijuana over prescription drugs | ATTN

Source: https://youtu.be/6VjLwUtiUYs

  • What are the drugs that are legal in your country?
  • Is marijuana legal in your country? Why (not)?
  • What do you know about marijuana?
  • Do you think that people have an accurate idea of drugs?
  • Why might a “harmless” drug like marijuana be banned?
  • Do you think that this video is accurate, or is there a slant (bias) to it?

A simple exercise from a mindfulness workshop developed at Google can help beat anxiety before it starts | Business Insider

Read here: http://www.businessinsider.sg/search-inside-yourself-how-to-beat-anxiety-before-it-starts-2016-11/?r=US&IR=T#CDKgJYr8SpvAyAxI.97

“Emotions are actually feelings in the body.”

Here’s how it works: Starting at the top of your head, check in with every part of your body and notice how it feels. Are your cheeks hot? Are your fists clenched? You might be experiencing anger. Or, is your heart pounding? Are your palms sweating? You might be experiencing anxiety.

This might seem like kindergarten stuff — everyone over the age of five knows what anger and anxiety feel like. But the point here is to catch the negative feeling while it’s still simmering, before it spirals out of control.

At SIY, we practiced the body scan for 15 minutes, though you can easily do a 10-second version. Either way, use it as an opportunity to notice what’s going on in your body and get curious about it. What might you be feeling and why? Simply labeling the emotion, and accepting it, can decrease its intensity.

Questions:

  • Do you often feel anxious? Why? What are some ways to calm yourself down?
  • Do you think this tip will work for you? Why (not)?

Age is a state of mind for ‘China’s hottest grandpa’ | Today

Read here: http://www.todayonline.com/chinaindia/china/age-state-mind-chinas-hottest-grandpa

So has old fresh meat replaced young fresh meat?

Perhaps not. But Mr Wang’s physicality, notable in a society where men rarely highlight their attractiveness, also sets an example in a nation that is growing older fast.

“People can change their life as many times as they wish,” he said. Having a goal is important, he said.

“Being mentally healthy means you know what you’re going to do,” he said. “For example, a vegetable vendor, when he wakes up, he has a goal, he works hard. And when he finishes, he feels fulfilled.”

For Mr Wang, fulfillment comes in many forms: acting, modeling, exercising and creating art.

Source: https://youtu.be/AhNgj-sn77M

How your phone is bad for your health | Tech Insider

Source: https://youtu.be/HhYDY-6jDO4

Questions:

  • Do you do any of these things?
  • Do you feel your sleep has been affected since you started using mobile phones?
  • How far would you agree with these claims?
  • Are there other things people could do to reduce the impact of technology on their health?