How some glue and a rusty bike helped a Nepalese girl escape child marriage | The Guardian

Read: https://www.theguardian.com/working-in-development/2017/nov/09/nepal-the-girl-who-started-a-business-instead-of-becoming-a-child-bride

 

Questions:

  1. What do you consider a good age to get married at?
  2. Who are likely to marry early? Why?
  3. Who are likely to marry late? Why?
  4. What are the advantages and disadvantages of marrying early / late?
  5. Does marrying early have more advantages or disadvantages for girls? What about for boys?
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Hair – Politics or Fashion

Questions:

  1. Do you have long hair or short? Why?
  2. (If you say because men have short hair, and women have long hair, this was a rather recent convention. Watch the next video.)
  3. Do you know any cultures where men have/had long hair?
  4. Should hair be a political statement, a fashion statement, or anything else?

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Read: http://jpninfo.com/44674https://www.independent.ie/style/beauty/hair/are-man-buns-really-the-new-beards-for-hipsters-30868993.html

Questions:

  1. Why did Japanese men during the Edo era keep a hairstyle called the chonmage top knot with shaved parts?
  2. Do you like the hipster man bun?

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Read: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Kesh_(Sikhism)http://stellarreaches.nwgamers.org/2017/03/18/imperial-fashion/

Questions:

  1. Why do Sikhs keep long hair?
  2. Why did the Chinese have a queue/pigtail?

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(Source: https://youtu.be/7yKrzHAGj2c)

(Source: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=R1acEHz7FRM)

(Source: https://www.facebook.com/rackednational/videos/1832461570117360/)

Questions:

  1. After learning all this information, what is your opinion on hair length for men and women?
  2. Would you try something different?
  3. Should hair be a political statement, a fashion statement, or anything else?

Malawi’s fearsome chief, terminator of child marriages | Al Jazeera

http://www.aljazeera.com/indepth/features/2016/03/malawi-fearsome-chief-terminator-child-marriages-160316081809603.html

Slightly personal take on the issue; some gory details of what the customs entail.

She was shocked when she saw girls as young as 12 with babies and teenaged husbands, and was soon ordering the people to give up their ways

“I told them: ‘Whether you like it or not, I want these marriages to be terminated.'”

A 2012 United Nations survey found that more than half of Malawi’s girls were married before the age of 18. It ranked Malawi 8th out of 20 countries thought to have the highest child-marriage rates in the world.

Last year, Malawi’s parliament passed a law forbidding marriage before the age of 18. But under customary law of the traditional authorities, and the constitution, Malawian children can still marry with parental consent.

On the human development index, Malawi is considered as one of the world’s poorest places, ranking 160th out of 182 nations. Early marriage is more common in rural areas, where parents are eager to get girls out of the house to ease their financial burden.

Emilida Misomali is part of a mothers group in the village of Chimoya, in Dedza district. They warn parents about the long-term ills of early marriage and childbirth, but say it falls on deaf ears.

Many parents did not want to hear Kachindamoto’s pleas to keep their girls in school, or her assurances that an educated girl would bring them a greater fortune.

The common response was that she had no right to overturn tradition, nor, as the mother of five boys, to lecture others on the upbringing of girls.

Realising that she couldn’t change the traditionally set mentality of parents, Kachindamoto instead changed the law.

She got her 50 sub-chiefs to sign an agreement to abolish early marriage under customary law, and annul any existing unions in her area of authority.

When she learned that child marriages were still taking place in some areas, she fired four male chiefs responsible for these areas. They returned months later to tell her that all marriages had been undone. After sending people to verify this, she hired the chiefs back.

Questions:

  1. What are some bad customs in your culture?
  2. Why are the customs bad?
  3. Who they cause the most problems for?
  4. Why do you think these customs came about?

Women writers here are emerging into the spotlight | Today

http://m.todayonline.com/lifestyle/words-women

Kenny Leck, owner of Math Paper Press, said that, in his experience, most women write while in university, but “writing takes a backseat” after graduation because of the demands of work and “unbalanced” gender roles in the family.

Questions:

  • Have women made enough progress in terms of career, life choices, status, etc?
  • Are there fields where women are overrepresented? Which, and why?
  • Are women underrepresented in certain fields? Which? Why is this so?
  • How can women increase their level of representation in these felds?

Perceptions

Source: https://www.facebook.com/playgroundenglish/videos/359205304412806/

Questions:

  • What was your first impression of the girl in the hijab/tudung?
  • Do you think that women should/can be as aggressive as men?
  • What do you feel about people who don’t dress/behave in a similar way to other people?
  • What is your opinion of Kubra Dagli?
  • Why has she created a controversy?

Gender Clothing | Viral Thread

Source: https://www.facebook.com/viralthread/videos/566703230186045/

Source: https://youtu.be/ute8f3Z63dY

Questions:

  • Is there a particular style /colour of clothing that you like?
  • Should men and women / boys and girls wear different kinds of clothes?
  • What has this segregation (separation) led to? Are these effects positive, negative or neutral?

Bound for Marriage as a Child, Now a Change Agent for Kenyan Girls | National Geographic

http://news.nationalgeographic.com/2016/09/kakenya-ntaiya-rolex-explorer-moments/

Like many Maasai girls, Ntaiya’s future was mapped by cultural tradition: marital engagement at age five, followed by a circumcision as a teen, a painful rite of passage that would mark the end of her formal education and lead to marriage and children.

Refusing to accept her fate, she told her father she would agree to be circumcised, but only if she could finish high school and continue her education, threatening to run away and disgrace her family. After acquiescing to the painful coming-of-age ceremony, she was able to extricate herself from an early marriage and then negotiated with village elders, who allowed Ntaiya to leave if she promised to return and use her schooling to benefit the community.

“Parents now see that their girls have another future—to have different lives than them, to have good jobs, and a way out of poverty,’’ says Ntaiya, a 2010 National Geographic emerging explorer.

  • How has the status of different groups of people (eg. women, old people) changed in your country in the past 50 or 100 years?
  • What is the best way to change a society?
  • Do you think change is always good?
  • What are some negative effects that this change might have had on her community?